The Kitáb-i-Aqdas
Notes
58.To none is it permitted to seek absolution from another soul   ¶34
Bahá’u’lláh prohibits confession to, and seeking absolution of one’s sins from, a human being. Instead one should beg forgiveness from God. In the Tablet of Bishárát, He states that “such confession before people results in one’s humiliation and abasement,” and He affirms that God “wisheth not the humiliation of His servants.”1
Shoghi Effendi sets the prohibition into context. His secretary has written on his behalf that we
…are forbidden to confess to any person, as do the Catholics to their priests, our sins and shortcomings, or to do so in public, as some religious sects do. However, if we spontaneously desire to acknowledge we have been wrong in something, or that we have some fault of character, and ask another person’s forgiveness or pardon, we are quite free to do so.
The Universal House of Justice has also clarified that Bahá’u’lláh’s prohibition concerning the confession of sins does not prevent an individual from admitting transgressions in the course of consultations held under the aegis of Bahá’í institutions. Likewise, it does not preclude the possibility of seeking advice from a close friend or of a professional counsellor regarding such matters.
 
1 Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh : Bishárát, pp. 24-25 (ninth Glad-Tidings)